Join the UCSF Police Department

The UCSF Police Department is a service-oriented, community policing organization charged with providing the very best public safety services to the campus community. All sworn officers have full police powers statewide, with primary jurisdiction on property owned, operated or controlled by University of California. University police officers are responsible for all aspects of law enforcement services, including criminal investigation, community policing, crime prevention and suppression, emergency management, and site security services.

By coming to work at UCSF, you will be joining one of the premier health sciences teaching, training and research centers in the world with an illustrious history that dates back more than 120 years. Moreover, UCSF is the second-largest employer in San Francisco, with more than 27,000 students, faculty and staff located at more than 40 sites in San Francisco.

Read more about the UCSF Police Department at About Us.

Job Opportunities

All current job opportunities are listed on the UCSF Careers website.  Select "Search openings" and under keyword, type "police" for a list of UCSF Police job opportunities. 

Employment FAQ

Q. Where can I find job listings for the UCSF Police Department?
A.  Click here to apply online. Select "Search Openings" and enter "Police" in the keyword field to locate all positions at the Police Department

Q. How can I apply for a job?
A. Submit your application and résumé through the UCSF online application process.

UCSF Police Department Job Application.

For more information, email GreatJobs@police.ucsf.edu.

Q. How long does it take to get hired by the UCSF Police Department?
A. Depending on the job you apply for, becoming a member of the UCSF Police Department can normally take from one to four months. The typical sworn and dispatch recruitment process includes a written exam, oral interview, background investigation, medical evaluation and psychological assessment, which can normally take about four months. Civilian positions require less time.